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Mathematics

Mathematics

 

Vision

The mathematics faculty strives to fulfil the mission statement of All Saints Catholic College by:

  • Aspiring to be a centre of excellence for team work at the college. 
  • Committing to constant improvement in the quality of teaching and learning.
  • Dedicating to raising the expectations of all students.
  • Supporting students to own their learning.
  • Contributing to the standing of the college so that parents and guardians see it as first choice.

 

 

Staff

The faculty consists of the following members of staff:

Mr C Mase (Faculty Leader
Miss C Appleyard
Mr J Cassidy
Mrs F Loonat (Teaching & Learning Responsibilty)
Mr T Shepherd (Assistant Headteacher)
 

 

Courses
Key Stage 3
The Key Stage 3 schedule is based on the National Curriculum and is a model of progression with five pathways referred to as Stages 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Students follow the stage appropriate to their ability on entry to the college and their rate of progression through it.

 


11-14 Pathway
 

L3 to L5

L4 to L6

L5 to L7+

 

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Y7

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

Y8

Stage 3

Stage 4

Stage 5

 Y9

 

Key Stage 4

The Key Stage 4 schedule is based on the National Curriculum and the specifications of the Edexcel GCSE mathematics A Foundation and Higher tiers. All pupils study a two-year linear course and take their GCSE examination when ready.

 

Content

1. Number
2. Algebra
3. Geometry
4. Measures
5. Statistics
6. Probability

 

Assessment

 

• Two written papers: each contributes 50% of the final grade
• Tiered papers

  • Foundation Tier grades C-G available
  • Higher Tier grades A*-D available (E allowed)

• 1 hour 45 minutes (Foundation papers)
• 1 hour 45 minutes (Higher papers)
• 100 marks on each paper
• Paper 1F and 1H: Non-calculator
• Paper 2F and 2H: Calculator
• The functional elements of mathematics are assessed on each paper:

  • 30-40% of the Foundation Tier papers
  • 20-30% of the Higher Tier papers.

 

Key Examination Dates - 2012/13

 

 

November 2012

 

February/March 2013

 

June 2013

 

Tuesday, 6/11/12  a.m.

Non-Calculator  1hr 45 min

 

Thursday, 8/11/12  p.m.

Calculator  1hr 45 min

 

Wednesday, 27/02/13  p.m.

Non-Calculator  1hr 45 min

 

Monday, 04/03/12  a.m.

Calculator  1hr 30 min

 

 

Tuesday, 11/06/13  a.m.

Non-Calculator  1hr 45 min

 

Friday, 14/06/13  a.m.

Calculator  1hr 30 min

 

 

 

High achieving pupils who are intending to study A-level mathematics will progress on to GCSE further mathematics. The qualification is assessed as a full Level 2 mathematics qualification.

 

Content

The course is set out in six distinct topic areas although questions will be asked that range across these topics.
Number
Algebra
Co-ordinate Geometry (2 dimensions only)
Calculus
Matrix Transformations
Geometry

 

Assessment

The Scheme of Assessment is linear with two question papers to be taken in the same examination series as detailed below.
Paper 1 Written paper (Non-calculator)
40% of the AQA Level 2 Certificate in Further Mathematics assessment - 1 hour 30 mins – 70 marks
Paper 2 Written paper (Calculator)
60% of the AQA Level 2 Certificate in Further Mathematics assessment - 2 hours – 105 marks

 

Guidance for Parents and Carers

  • Keep contact with school. Meet or talk with your child's teacher to see if your child is actively involved in maths. Find out how you can help your child to better understand maths problems.
  • Set high standards for your child in maths. Make sure your child is mathematically challenged and encourage his or her interest and pursuit of maths.
  • Help children see that maths is very much a part of everyday life. From statistics in sports to the sale price of clothing, from the calories in food to the amount of fuel needed to travel.
  • Point out that many jobs require maths. From the scientist to the doctor, from the manager to the newspaper salesman, from the computer programmer to the shop owner, all use maths.
  • Stimulate your child's interest in technology. Encourage your child to use calculators and computers to further learning.
  • Play games that develop decision making and mental math skills. Many games involve patterns and probability. Play games from your own family traditions that use strategies to make decisions, solve problems, and develop an understanding about numbers.
  • Positive attitudes about maths will reinforce encouragement. Your feelings will have an impact on how your children think about math and themselves as mathematicians. Positive attitudes about math are important in encouraging your child to think mathematically.

 

Find out more at:
http://www.math.com/parents/articles/mathachieve.html or http://www.mrbartonmaths.com/parents.htm