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Science

Key Stage 3 Science

Year 7:

Safety, Cells, Reproduction, Differences, Classification, Acids, Partticles, Elements and compounds, Chemical reactions, Electricity and Magnetism, Energy, Forces and Space

 

Year 8:

Life Support, Keeping Healthy, Peolpe and the environment, Shaping life, Periodic table, Inside materials, Metals reactions, What is rock, Heating and Cooling, Light, Sound, Moving around

 

Double Award & BTEC

 

Essence Statements

Courses are designed to help students:

Develop their scientific knowledge, understanding and skills.
Take responsibility for their own learning and behaviour.
Foster their curiosity.
Develop their ability to work in teams and hence improve their communication skills on their journey to becoming confident citizens able to play a full part in society.
Go on to a science-based career if they so wish.

 

Teaching Staff

Mrs K Walker
Mr D Crosdale         
Mrs C Steadman
Miss S Sardar          
Mr M Jackson-Diskin
Mrs N Eades
 

 

SCIENCE: DOUBLE AWARD AND BTEC

 

DOUBLE AWARD

 

  • Develop scientific knowledge, understanding and skills.
  • Take responsibility for your own learning and behaviour.
  • Foster your curiosity.
  • Develop your ability to work in teams and improve your communication skills on your journey to becoming confident citizens able to play a full part in society.
  • Go on to a science-based career if you so wish.

 

Course Details:


Biology Units


Biology 1a:  How do human bodies respond to changes inside them and to their environment?  What can we do to keep our bodies healthy?  How do we use/abuse medical and recreational drugs?  What causes infectious diseases and how can our bodies defend against them?
Biology 1b:  What determines where particular species live and how many of them are?  Why are individuals of the same species different from each other?  Why have some species of plants and animals die out?  How do new species of plants and animals develop?
Biology 2:  What are animals and plants built from?  How do dissolved substances get into and out of cells?  How do plants obtain the food they need to live and grow?  What happens to energy and biomass at each stage in a food chain?  How do our bodies keep internal conditions constant?  Which human characteristics show a simple pattern of inheritance?

 

Chemistry Units


Chemistry 1a:  How do rocks provide building materials?  How do rocks provide metals and how are metals used?  How do we get fuels from crude oil?
Chemistry 1b:  How are polymers and ethanol made from oil?  How can plant oils be used?  What are the changes in the Earth and its atmosphere?
Chemistry 2:  How do sub-atomic particles help us understand the structure of substances?  How do structures influence the properties and uses of substances?  How much can we make and how much do we need to use?  How can we control the rates of chemical reactions?  Do chemical reactions always release energy?  How can we use ions in solutions?

 

Physics Units


Physics 1a:  How is heat (thermal energy) transferred and what factors affect the rate at which heat is transferred?  What is meant by the efficient use of energy?  Why are electrical devices useful?  How should we generate the electricity we need?
Physics 1b:  What are the uses and hazards of the waves that form the electromagnetic spectrum?  What are the uses and dangers of emissions from radioactive substances?  What do we know about the origins of the Universe and how it continues to change?
Physics 2:  How can we describe the way things move?  How do we make things speed up or slow down?  What happens to the movement energy when things speed up or slow down?  What is momentum?  What is static electricity, how can it be used and what is the connection between static electricity and electric currents?  What happens to radioactive substances when they decay?  What are nuclear fission and nuclear fusion?

In addition to developing and increasing knowledge, the new Science course has incorporated a section called ‘How Science Works’. How Science Works is primarily about helping students to engage and challenge the science they meet in everyday life.  Students need to adopt a critical, questioning frame of mind, going ‘behind the scenes’ to understand the workings of science and how it impacts on society and their lives.  It will help students to:

  • Identify questions that science can and cannot address and how scientists look for the answers.
  • Evaluate scientific claims by judging the reliability and validity of evidence.
  • Question the scientific reports they see in the media, and to communicate their own findings.
  • Consider scientific findings in a wider context, recognising their tentative nature.  Students will be able to make informed judgements about science and technology, including any ethical issues which may arise.

 

 

SCIENCE BTEC

Examination Board and Syllabus: EDEXCEL BTEC Science

 

We believe that it is a better choice for you if you prefer continuous assessment to exams and expect to either study a vocational science course post-16 or take a portfolio of subjects which does not include science.  The assessment is based entirely on the portfolio of work for each unit. This could include written reports, posters, presentations and video reports.  It is essential that you complete all the assessment tasks for every unit so good attendance and continuous effort is very important.

 

Course Details:
There are six units: 

  • Chemistry Applications.
  • Physical Science Applications.
  • Biological Systems.
  • Anatomy and Physiology.
  • Scientific Principles.
  • Science and the world of work.

 

Recommendations about which students will engage in BTEC will be made by the Science Faculty in consultation with students and parents.

 

What can I do with a Science qualification?


Science is a core subject of the National Curriculum and is studied in Years 10 and 11.  The Government made Science a compulsory subject because it is important in so many careers.  A Science qualification at 16 opens doors to a wide spectrum of careers because employers are aware of the range of skills acquired during the course.  Such a qualification can also lead to many higher level and vocational courses, which in turn can lead on to a vast range of careers.

 

This course builds upon the foundations laid in KS3, with the aim of giving you the scientific knowledge you need to participate in a modern, technological society. It takes a more vocational approach to learning and prepares you for post-16 vocational courses.

 

 

TRIPLE AWARD SCIENCE

 

DOUBLE AWARD

 

  • Develop scientific knowledge, understanding and skills.
  • Take responsibility for your own learning and behaviour.
  • Foster your curiosity.
  • Develop your ability to work in teams and improve your communication skills on your journey to becoming confident citizens able to play a full part in society.
  • Go on to a science-based career if you so wish.

 

TRIPLE AWARD

 

  • Pupils who are looking for a science-orientated career such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary sciences, or even taking part in research or engineering.
  • Pupils who have a real interest in science and would be hoping to take A-Levels in one or more of the disciplines
  • Three separate GCSE’s awarded in:  Biology, Chemistry and Physics
  • Due to the high academic demands of this course, it will only be available to students who are consistently gaining a level 6 at the end of KS3

 

Course Details:


Biology Units
Biology 1a:  How do human bodies respond to changes inside them and to their environment?  What can we do to keep our bodies healthy?  How do we use/abuse medical and recreational drugs?  What causes infectious diseases and how can our bodies defend against them?
Biology 1b:  What determines where particular species live and how many of them are?  Why are individuals of the same species different from each other?  Why have some species of plants and animals die out?  How do new species of plants and animals develop?
Biology 2:  What are animals and plants built from?  How do dissolved substances get into and out of cells?  How do plants obtain the food they need to live and grow?  What happens to energy and biomass at each stage in a food chain?  How do our bodies keep internal conditions constant?  Which human characteristics show a simple pattern of inheritance?

 

Chemistry Units
Chemistry 1a:  How do rocks provide building materials?  How do rocks provide metals and how are metals used?  How do we get fuels from crude oil?
Chemistry 1b:  How are polymers and ethanol made from oil?  How can plant oils be used?  What are the changes in the Earth and its atmosphere?
Chemistry 2:  How do sub-atomic particles help us understand the structure of substances?  How do structures influence the properties and uses of substances?  How much can we make and how much do we need to use?  How can we control the rates of chemical reactions?  Do chemical reactions always release energy?  How can we use ions in solutions?

 

Physics Units
Physics 1a:  How is heat (thermal energy) transferred and what factors affect the rate at which heat is transferred?  What is meant by the efficient use of energy?  Why are electrical devices useful?  How should we generate the electricity we need?
Physics 1b:  What are the uses and hazards of the waves that form the electromagnetic spectrum?  What are the uses and dangers of emissions from radioactive substances?  What do we know about the origins of the Universe and how it continues to change?
Physics 2:  How can we describe the way things move?  How do we make things speed up or slow down?  What happens to the movement energy when things speed up or slow down?  What is momentum?  What is static electricity, how can it be used and what is the connection between static electricity and electric currents?  What happens to radioactive substances when they decay?  What are nuclear fission and nuclear fusion?

 

In addition to developing and increasing knowledge, the new Science course has incorporated a section called ‘How Science Works’. How Science Works is primarily about helping students to engage and challenge the science they meet in everyday life.  Students need to adopt a critical, questioning frame of mind, going ‘behind the scenes’ to understand the workings of science and how it impacts on society and their lives.  It will help students to:

 

  • Identify questions that science can and cannot address and how scientists look for the answers.
  • Evaluate scientific claims by judging the reliability and validity of evidence.
  • Question the scientific reports they see in the media, and to communicate their own findings.
  • Consider scientific findings in a wider context, recognising their tentative nature.  Students will be able to make informed judgements about science and technology, including any ethical issues which may arise.

 

What can I do with a Science qualification?
Science is a core subject of the National Curriculum and is studied in Years 10 and 11.  The Government made Science a compulsory subject because it is important in so many careers.  A Science qualification at 16 opens doors to a wide spectrum of careers because employers are aware of the range of skills acquired during the course.  Such a qualification can also lead to many higher level and vocational courses, which in turn can lead on to a vast range of careers.

 

This course builds upon the foundations laid in KS3, with the aim of giving you the scientific knowledge you need to participate in a modern, technological society. It takes a more vocational approach to learning and prepares you for post-16 vocational courses.